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Sunday, June 1

  1. page <The Road> <Katy Creighton> edited ... Review: This was a phenomenal book, a book to read slowly, to savor; not one to speed through…
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    Review:
    This was a phenomenal book, a book to read slowly, to savor; not one to speed through to hasten ingestion of the plot. There are events that are exceedingly grim in this, focusing on despair, suicide, cannibalism. Yet the love of the father for his son is palpable and despite the omnipresent gray ash, there remain slivers of hope. Highly recommended, but this is not a book for those with a weak stomach. The book also tended to be confusing at times, speeding through points and dragging out other. Overall this was a great read, and the kind of book you feel different after finishing.

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  2. page <The Road> <Katy Creighton> edited {The-Road.jpg} Review: 4.5 Stars Summary: McCarthys The Road is the story of father and son try…

    {The-Road.jpg} Review: 4.5 Stars
    Summary: McCarthys The Road is the story of father and son trying to survive in a post apocalyptic world. This father and son duo are traveling on a road Southward to avoid a frigid Winter. The road is set in a dystopian world, covered with and ash, and mostly uninhabited. On their way south, they encounter many obstacles such as extreme elements, natural disasters, starvation, and their most horrific foe: cannibals. The boy and man in the story, as well as time period remain unknown heightening to the mystery making the dystopia seem as it would happen to anyone.
    Review:
    This was a phenomenal book, a book to read slowly, to savor; not one to speed through to hasten ingestion of the plot. There are events that are exceedingly grim in this, focusing on despair, suicide, cannibalism. Yet the love of the father for his son is palpable and despite the omnipresent gray ash, there remain slivers of hope. Highly recommended, but this is not a book for those with a weak stomach. The book also tended to be confusing at times, speeding through points and dragging out other. Overall this was a great read, and the kind of book you feel different after finishing.

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Saturday, May 31

  1. page On Such A Full Sea edited {81-TBZijjPL.jpg} Rating: 3 stars Summary: Told through the collective consciousness of her co…
    {81-TBZijjPL.jpg}
    Rating: 3 stars
    Summary: Told through the collective consciousness of her community, On Such A Full Sea follows the story of young Fan, a tank diver, as she leaves the safety and stability of her home B-mor for the wilderness of the counties in which her boyfriend has disappeared. Tiny and pregnant with Reg's child, she is nevertheless levelheaded and goal-oriented throughout her travels and trials. She goes from being a celebrated tank diver, taking care of the fish B-mor cultivates, and walking around holding hands with Reg, to leaving to go after him once he suddenly vanishes, to becoming symbol for B-mor, painted on the sides of buildings. Her story traverses the B-mor colony, to counties, to the lavish, extravagant Charter villages as she searches everywhere for Reg, who has been discovered as somehow immune to the mysterious group of fatal illnesses, C, that affects everyone, Charter or worker alike.
    Review: It took a little getting used to the narration style, since it is so unusual, and the removed, detached perspective can make Fan flat and monochromatic in a way the Katniss never was in The Hunger Games, but it allows a strange fluidity of narration that is quite distinctive. There are some plot twists that might seem obvious, but are played out in such a way to make them new and horrifying, and Chang-rae's writing is beautiful. However, the weird narrative required some to powering through, and perhaps because of this, the book seems to drag on and on. The premise of the world itself is interesting: polluted lands no longer able to support them, Chinese workers relocated to North America and formed labor settlements that specialize in agricultural products to supply the rich Charter villages with everything they could want for. Outside the labor settlements and Charters, however, lies the vast wasteland, desolate and yawning that Fan ventures into. From a logistical standpoint, not much lines up,

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  2. page Book Reviews 2013 edited ... Title of Book Your Name Lee, Chang-rae On Such A Full Sea Thea Cheuk Lupica, Mike Trav…
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    Title of Book
    Your Name
    Lee, Chang-rae
    On Such A Full Sea
    Thea Cheuk

    Lupica, Mike
    Travel Team
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Friday, May 30

  1. page The Man in the High Castle Sean Desmond edited {High Castle cover.jpg} Rating: 3 Stars Summary: This book is an alternate-history of what mig…
    {High Castle cover.jpg} Rating:
    3 Stars
    Summary:
    This book is an alternate-history of what might have happened had the Axis powers won World War II. The Nazis and Japanese have divided up the world and are the two super powers in the midst of their own cold war of sorts. The story takes place in 1963 (the year it was written in real life) and follows a couple different characters. All of the characters live in the western end of the former United States, which is primarily under Japanese control. A recurring item was this guy that wrote a book called the "Grasshopper Lies Heavy" which was an alternate-history inside this alternate-history about what if the Allies had won the war, but it still wasn't exactly like real life. It's confusing, but the point is to make you think what is real and what isn't.
    Review:
    This is a really interesting subject, and the book isn't bad. But it does have a slow pace to it, hence the only 3 stars. It is actually a really deep story and makes you think a lot. The morals and lessons are pretty good and it uses real history to build a world of fantasy in an alternate-history. I would recommend it if you have the patience for a slower book that doesn't have much action in it.

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    8:43 pm

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